Slow Down

20190110_165610As we enter 2019, I’m moved to slow down and do less, which is totally counter to the cultural push around the New Year. Thing is, we’re more productive and ultimately more successful when we slow down and focus on one thing at a time. What happens for me is that I notice I’m rushing or trying to do multiple things at once and that I’m concurrently feeling scattered and stressed. This is when I know I need to dial it back using the following strategies:

Let something go undone.If I’m juggling too many things or have a to-do list that’s too long, I allow myself to let something of little significance go. Maybe it’s a chore that can wait, a phone call that can be made later, or a project that is low priority.

Delegate and/or ask for help. Assign chores and tasks to family members or consider hiring help at home. Let those close to you know that you’re choosing to slow down and do less, and ask for their support.

Act with intention. If you notice that you’re becoming scattered with multi-tasking, choose one thing to do intentionally until you come back to center.

Literally slow down.Put both feet on the floor and take a few centering breaths. Choose to move more slowly and more mindfully through your next task or activity. Notice how you feel in your body. Focus your attention on something in the present moment. For me right now, it’s the sound of the keyboard, the hush of the heater, and the afternoon light filtering in through my office window.

The Long Pause

fb_img_1545784640151So, it’s a new year. Are you excited? Are you ready? Are you full of hope and inspiration? Have you set goals and made resolutions? Are you also, perhaps, a little overrun with the energy of newness and new beginnings? Perhaps, like me, you’re still wrapping up 2018, processing, and preparing for new things to come. January marks the beginning of the Gregorian calendar, which has been around since the late 1500’s. It carries a lot of cultural and historical weight, giving January 1 some real significance, but it’s not aligned with the cycles of nature. In the natural world, the time of new beginnings is the Spring Equinox, falling on March 20 this year. For this reason, January can be a kind of long pause. It can be a time to continue to reflect and essentially “put away” the prior year as we also look ahead for what’s to come. If jumping into all things new doesn’t feel authentic for you, it may be that you’re more aligned with the natural cycles and that come spring you’ll be ready to blossom. Meanwhile, enjoy the space in between and make time for silent reflection. Take long walks in nature, meditate, or curl up in the warmth of home with a good book. Fill your space with candlelight, or bask in the winter sun. One year is behind us, and another is ahead. Give yourself the gift of a mindful transition. May your year be filled with peace and ease. 

Allowing Chaos

FB_IMG_1499915438640 (1)Our instinct is to avoid pain and suffering, and chaos is certainly something that we all know can lead to both, so it makes sense that we’d like to avoid chaos as well. There are times, though, when we can’t avoid the craziness of life. That’s when our best bet is to allow it to be. Here’s how:

Choose to let a few things go. For example, I recently bought a house and am not fully moved in and, because of some home improvements, it will be awhile before I’m settled. In this case, I choose to let some things just be as they are. The house is messier than I’d like, but I choose to let it go for now, knowing that in time I will make this house a home.

Notice that you are not the chaos. Whether it’s drama or stress created by others, circumstances beyond our control, or even fall-out from our own mistakes, we can choose to be the observer. Take a few mindful, centering breaths. See the situation from a distance. Notice all of the facts. Allow emotions without attaching, and remind yourself that you are not the chaos. The chaos is moving through; it’s not who you are or the totality of your life.

Practice self-care and boundaries. Probably one of the best things we can do for ourselves when the shit hits the fan is practice self-care. Do loving and nurturing things for yourself with presence and intention. Some examples are: eating healthy food, getting extra rest, taking a warm bath, being in nature, and spending time with friends and loved ones who uplift you. Practice self-compassion by directing loving kindness at yourself through words and actions. Also, set boundaries around the chaos. If it’s a particular person, take breaks from communicating with them. If it’s the news and current events, go on a media diet.

It’s easier to gain our footing in a changing and uncertain world when we’ve first attended to ourselves, calmed our nervous systems, and fed our bodies, hearts, and souls. Allowing things to be as they are is a gift to oneself. By releasing our resistance, we reduce tension and open up to new possibilities, solutions, and outcomes.

The Only Constant is Change

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Just when we think things are settling in and a period of change is over, here comes yet another unexpected shift. It may be in our personal life, on the world stage, or in our family or community. Sometimes, it’s in more than one place. Change is everywhere! Over the last few years, there has been major, earth-shifting change in all areas of my life. I’d like to say that I’m used to it, but it still surprises me. This steady stream of change has taught me to allow people, things, jobs, homes, ideas, beliefs, and more to come and go. When I begin to cling to something, I invite suffering (looks like the Buddha was right about that one).

Nothing on this earth is promised to me, or to you. We can have legal ownership over things, partnership agreements with people, and a sense of belonging to places, but none of that comes with a guarantee. What seemed to be ours one moment, like the sunhat I wore on a river trip this summer, can quickly disappear and, in this example, be swallowed up by moving water. 

Knowing this, we can practice presence, savoring, gratitude, and focused awareness. We can be here now, knowing that it’s truly the only moment and that change, like it or not, is always on the horizon.

Being With What Is

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The Buddhist concept of hopelessness means to look to the present as it is instead of looking to the past or future with fear or hope. It asks us to be with what is, as it is. To do this, we must cultivate feelings of neutrality and equanimity. Being with what is means that:

  • We allow our present moment experience without judgement.
  • We notice our thoughts, feelings, and sensations as an observer.
  • We release attachment to making things different.
  • We notice our emotional response with kindness and curiosity.
  • We allow ourselves to feel how we feel without self-criticism or attachment.
  • We recognize the transient nature of our experience.

The Art of Surrender

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It takes a great deal of strength and courage to allow life to be as it is,  and equal amounts of awareness to notice when we’re resisting the simple reality of our experience. Many of us resist as a matter of course. We’re trying to make things a certain way. We’re working, we’re efforting, we’re creating, or so we think. Sometimes, all of the effort and puzzling out gets in the way of life’s natural unfolding. We’re so busy trying to change or create, that we aren’t able to take in what’s right in front of us. We miss important information and enriching experiences. Mindfulness helps us slow down and be in the present moment so that we’re better able to take in and savor the goodness of life, and also to notice when opportunity is ripe. There’s less efforting and exertion when we surrender to the present and trust that all will be well.

Tips for When Things Fall Apart

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With our current state of affairs in the nation and in the world, it’s important to practice self-care so we can continue to show up ready to serve the greater good.
1. Go within first. If you encounter a difficult story in the news or witness something unjust, take a moment to check in with yourself. Connect with the breath in your body.
2. Be compassionate. Offer yourself self-compassion. As we bear witness to violence and injustice, we experience suffering. Acknowledge this and allow the grief, rage, anger, or fear to process through.
3. Stay connected. Remember that we’re all in this together. There isn’t a us and a them. There’s only an us. Try to cultivate feelings of compassion for others, even if they are behaving in ways that are harmful.
4. Grow the good. The world is full of goodness. We each have so much to be grateful for. Focus on the good all around you and see if you can’t build upon it.